Are you Coherent?   There’s a “Task” for that. 

coherence

The purpose of this blog is to write about different resources on the Iowa Core Website Mathematics Website to highlight some of the features of the resources.  There is a 5 min screen-cast at the bottom of this blog for visual learners.

2/14/17   Today, there is an “app” for everything but for standards and mathematics, there’s a “task for that.  The Coherence Maps from Achieve the Core offers “tasks” to understand the standards.  These “tasks” show the mathematics behind the standards.

The Coherence Maps – Shows the connections between Common Core State Standards for Mathematics.  The first opens up to a page to the different grade levels, then further opens into domains and clusters.  The clusters are annotated as major or supporting clusters.  Opening an individual standard:

  • Explore the map – Click on the magnifying glass to minimize the expanded standard card and explore the map.
  • Arrows: An arrow (A->B) indicates related standards in cases where a student who cannot meet A is not likely to be able to meet B.  (Note, the arrow does not necessarily mean that A must be mastered before B, or that learning B is the immediate next step after learning A.
  • Dashed Lines: A dashed line (A–B) indicates related standards.

The “Tasks”gives an illustration of the standard, a check for understanding, and solution.  To access the HS standards, enter through 8th grade.

Learn more about the Coherence Map – Standards relate to one another, both within and across grades. The Coherence Map is an interactive website that illustrates the coherent structure of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics K-8. This site provides one representation of how the Standards are connected to each other, and is derived from this wiring diagram.  The wiring diagram give a visual picture of how all the students are coherent and build for future learning.

The resources below explain what coherence means in the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics and how this tool can be used to support understanding and instructional planning.

1.How to use the Coherence Map Each of the Standards is illustrated with tasks, lessons, and assessments, as well as excerpts from the progression documents. The Coherence Map and supporting resources can be used to:

  • Build student understanding by linking together concepts within and across grades.
  • Identify gaps in a student’s knowledge by tracing a standard back through its logical pre-requisites.
  • Visualize and understand how supporting standards relate to the major work of the grade.

2. Understand Coherence

  • Use the Coherence Activity: Uncovering Progressions and Themes from the Deep Dive Into the Math Shifts Professional Development to support a stronger understanding of coherence.

Using these resources can have a huge impact on instruction.  It is easy to see if a student is struggling with a standard, what the prior knowledge they must possess is.  Educators can look at the map, see the previous skill, and work backwards until they identify where the gap is.  The idea just occurred to me, that this tool could support writing pre-assessments based on the standards that come before.  That would have been such a useful tool while I was in the classroom.

Call to Action:

  • Pick a grade level and domain to explore for Coherence
  • Share with a colleague
  • Use these resources to identify where student gaps exist

To get to the Coherence Map on the Iowa Core Mathematics Standards.  Look in the Instruction column,  select Mathematical Content and Practice Standards, then look under Resources.

Next Blog:  Progression Documents – Explains why standards are sequenced the way they are, points out cognitive difficulties and pedagogical solutions, and gives more detail on challenging areas of the mathematics.

I hope you will read the next blog, provide feedback, and share with others.  These resources can help educators to focus on instruction and experiences for students to grow their love of mathematics.

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Please contact me with questions at april.pforts@iowa.gov

Disclaimer: We are a local control state so districts can choose to use free or vendor resources and which vendor they will use. “The Iowa Department of Education endorses the free resources directly linked in the Iowa Core subject pages; other vendors, products, or services which are published on the site have not been reviewed.”

Do you know how to shift?

atc

The purpose of this blog is to write about different resources on the Iowa Core Website Mathematics Website to highlight some of the features of the resources.  There is a 5 min screen-cast at the bottom of this blog for visual learners.

2/13/17  Do you know how to learn about the mathematical shifts?  Achieve the Core has ready made modules for professional development for self-study, and small/large group. Standards Shifts in Mathematics.  It is far easier to edit resources than it is to build them from scratch.  Start with great resources made my experts and design them to meet your specific educational need.

The Standards Shifts in Mathematics is where to find many resources:

On The Shifts page there is a summary of the The Common Core State Standards Shifts in Mathematics with resources to learn more and deeply understand each shift.  The Focus has a grade level resources to understand the major and supporting clusters.  Additionally, the Focus section contains a resource for Widely Applicable Prerequisites High School.  Under the Coherence section are Coherence Maps and The Structure is the Standards.

My favorite part of this resource are the two modules for professional development.  Each of these modules contain a User’s Guide, Power Point Presentation with and without notes, Activities, Reflection, and Related Research and Readings.  Be sure to read the User’s Guide first.  There are adaptions for if you need a one, two, or four professional development session.   There is an Introduction the Math Shifts and Deep Dive into the Math Shifts.

Call to Action:

  • Pick a resource to explore
  • Share with a colleague
  • Use a module for professional development

To get to the Standard Shifts in Mathematics on the Iowa Core Mathematics Standards.  Look in the Instruction column,  select Mathematical Content and Practice Standards, then look under Resources.

Next Blog: Coherence Maps – Shows the connections between Common Core State Standards for Mathematics.

I hope you will read the next blog, provide feedback, and share with others.  These resources can help educators to focus on instruction and experiences for students to grow their love of mathematics.

atcScreencast

Please contact me with questions at april.pforts@iowa.gov

Disclaimer: We are a local control state so districts can choose to use free or vendor resources and which vendor they will use. “The Iowa Department of Education endorses the free resources directly linked in the Iowa Core subject pages; other vendors, products, or services which are published on the site have not been reviewed.”

Do you really know the research to back it up?

research-and-articles

The purpose of this blog is to write about different resources on the Iowa Core Website Mathematics Website to highlight some of the features of the resources.  There is a 5 min screen-cast at the bottom of this blog for visual learners.

2/8/17  Do you really know the research to back it up?  A great deal of research was use before during and after writing the standards.  Research and Articles is a place to start learning about the research and articles written before, during, and after the standards were developed.

Research and Articles – critical research supporting the Common Core Standards.  This link redirects to the Achieve the Core website under Professional Learning.  It contains 25 different titles and some titles contain multiple files.  There is an option for each title to view a description or the file.

What did we know about student achievement in 2005 before the standards were written?  This research tells us.  Reassessing US International Mathematics Performance: New Findings from the 2003 TIMSS and PISA: American Institute of Research  The researchers concluded that where a student is at in 4th grade is likely where the student will be in high school.  Wow!  This has huge implications.  This means that as educators, we have to make sure to hit the mark when they are little.  If we want students to be successful, then we have to start them off strong!  One of my favorite parts of this document was that math Guru Steve Leinwand is one of the authors.  This gave me confidence it the information in this research because Steve is an educator of integrity.  (The others might be too but I do not personally know them.

I also found this treasure on this website  The Progression Documents for the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics.  If you have not read these, or at the very least, skimmed these, this is a must!  I guarantee if you skim these, you will want to read them.  They are so user friendly to read.  There are 18 different documents and each one does a wonderful job to deepen and conceptually understand the standards and the mathematics and learning in the different clusters of standards.  The part that I really liked about these was the structure of the document.  For example: in the Preface one, it explains the standards and the research that supports the standards is on the right side next to where it is being used.  It was so nice to read part, see the research, and go deeper if I chose too.  Then the other progression documents have a similar structure but include the standards right next to the part that you are reading.  It is all right there with even some clarifying notes in the margin.

Other articles that I found really interesting were:

Call to Action:

  • Pick an article or research piece to read
  • Read one a week
  • Share the resources with other educators

To get to the Research and Articles on the Iowa Core Mathematics Standards.  Look in the Instruction column,  select Mathematical Content and Practice Standards, then look under Research.

Next Blog:   Standards Shifts in Mathematics – Resources from Achieve the Core include a video, a Shifts Quick-Reference Card (wallet-size), and a Mathematics Core Shifts at a Glance.

I hope you will read the next blog, provide feedback, and share with others.  These resources can help educators to focus on instruction and experiences for students to grow their love of mathematics.

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Please contact me with questions at april.pforts@iowa.gov

Disclaimer: We are a local control state so districts can choose to use free or vendor resources and which vendor they will use. “The Iowa Department of Education endorses the free resources directly linked in the Iowa Core subject pages; other vendors, products, or services which are published on the site have not been reviewed.”

 

Do you really know what you think you know?

hunt

The purpose of this blog is to write about different resources on the Iowa Core Website Mathematics Website to highlight some of the features of the resources.  There is a 5 min screen-cast at the bottom of this blog for visual learners.

2/8/17  Do you really know the research to back it up?  We often do not know what we do not know.  I did not know the information that can be found on the The Hunt Institute.  I tend to be an educator that looks things up because I like to know the source to know if something is credible or not.  Even though, I had done this,  I learned many new things on the site that I did not know.

The Hunt Institute  was established in 2001, and honors the legacy of for the former governor of North Carolina who was a champion of education. They are a is a recognized leader in the movement to transform public education and network with many other reputable groups below to list just a few with many more listed on the bottom of their website.

I return our focus back to The Hunt Institute – their YouTube channel.  When this page loads, it will auto-start playing a video

Common Core State Standards: A New Foundation for Student Success

about the history of the standards, development, and promise of college-and-career ready students.  This video was posted 5 years ago, yet it has only had 140,401 views.  That number seems strangely low and ponder how many of us have ever watched this, why did we not know about this resource, and how many others in education have not watched or do not know this information?  It seems in this age, with all the ways to communicate and as much as we are “wired” in, there this video would have went viral.  Although, I will show my age a bit, and say, I never thought “viral” would be something we would all want someday. (lol)

We can further select to look at the Math Standards.  The link opens up to the play list for mathematics that contains 17 videos, 8 minutes or less.  Again, I noticed very few views.  How is it, these have been watch so few times.  Makes me wonder how much we really know.  I think this brings up a topic that I have come to appreciate; we do not know what we do not know.  Below are a few of the videos that you will find.

I also notice that there are only 2,862 subscribers to the channel.  That is about the population of a town with a 2A school district in Iowa.  That seems like a very small number when the whole population of educators is considered.  Perhaps, educators have found other ways to know and understand this information.

So who are the people in the videos?  One is Professor William McCallum and the other is Jason Zimba Ph.D.  They were the Math Team Coordinators.  Many educators have used their resources such as Illustrative Mathematics, Bill McCallum, and Achieve the Core, Jason Zimba.  This explains why these resources are aligned and so many educators value them for instruction with the standards.

Call to Action:

  • Consider what you actually know about the history of the development of the standards
  • Make a commitment to watch the videos and learn more
  • Share the resources with other educators
  • Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others

To get to the Hunt Institute on the Iowa Core Mathematics Standards.  Look in the Instruction column,  select Mathematical Content and Practice Standards, then look under Research.

Next Blog:  Research and Articles – Critical research supporting the Common Core Standards.

I hope you will read the next blog, provide feedback, and share with others.  These resources can help educators to focus on instruction and experiences for students to grow their love of mathematics.

huntScreencast

Please contact me with questions at april.pforts@iowa.gov

Disclaimer: We are a local control state so districts can choose to use free or vendor resources and which vendor they will use. “The Iowa Department of Education endorses the free resources directly linked in the Iowa Core subject pages; other vendors, products, or services which are published on the site have not been reviewed.”